Google April, 2010 | Emilys Oils-Essential Oils

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In the news
Posted on: April 22, 2010

I have had four men call this month looking for some help in treating toe nail fungus. I decided to do some research and come up with some advice.

Trichophyton rubrum is the most common culprit (estimated to be the cause of 80% of fungal toe nail infections) followed by T. mentagrophytes. They both invade keratinized tissue and produce a yellowed nail that is often thickened and lifted from the nail bed. Any fungal nail infection can be very difficult to get rid of and there are many home remedies. Oral antifungal medication can have some serious side effects and need to be taken for up to a year and more. Topic treatments have not proven themselves to be effective although a nail-polish like medicine is now available and needs to be used for just as long.

Clearly, a person needs to be diligent with whatever method they choose. You will need to develop a habit and continue it for the length of time it takes your body to grow a completely new nail. Hygene is super-important, clean or dispose of your nail implements after each use.  T. rubrum and its fellows are viable in the environment for up to 15 months and we are the primary hosts and reservoirs in the environment. I suggest that you begin your treatment with a closely trimmed nail that is also filed thin. Make this as easy on yourself as you can, don’t try to treat nail that can be trimmed or filed away. I also suggest using a method of gauging efficacy. Don’t rely on what it looks like from day to day.

Work at the University of Derby and at University of Central England in the UK showed that ‘Tea tree oil and Lavender oil, when used in isolation, demonstrated unequivocal fungicidal activity’ against Trichophyton rubrum. Lavandula angustifolia was used. These essential oils can be used undiluted on the skin. Undiluted amounts of these essential oils measured in drops per week are very safe. For this therapy, the essential oils will be applied to the nail surface and cut end.

The University of Allahabad, India and St Thomas’s Hospital, London, UK conducted some work to determine the anti-fungal properties of some essential oils. ‘Foeniculum vulgare exhibited the strongest activity, completely inhibiting the mycelial growth of the nail-infective fungi, Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes and Scytalidium dimidiatum.’

Studies showed that Fennel essential oil was effective at 0.2, 0.4 and 0.5 ul/ml concentrations and that a concentration of 5% did not have an adverse affect on mammalian skin.

It is possible that the destructive work done by T. rubrum has allowed some colonization by a secondary fungus. These essential oils are known anti-fungals. Roman chamomile, Lavender spike, Myrrh, Opopanox, Savory and Garlic.

I have had 4 men call this month looking for some help in treating toe nail fungus. I decided to do some research and come up with some advice. It can be very difficult to get rid of. Trichophyton rubrum is the most common culprit (estimated to be the cause of 80% of fungal toe nail infections) followed by T. mentagrophytes. They both invade keratinized tissue and produce a yellowed nail that is often thickened and lifted from the nail bed. Oral antifungal medication can have some serious side effects and need to be taken for up to a year and more. Topic treatments have not proven themselves to be effective. A nail-polish like medicine is now available and needs to be used for a year and more.

Clearly, a person needs to be diligent with whatever method they choose. You will need to develop a habit and continue it for the length of time it takes your body to grow a completely new nail. Hygene is super-important, clean or dispose of your nail implements after each use.  T. rubrum and its fellows are viable in the environment for up to 15 months and we are the primary hosts and reservoirs in the environment. I suggest that you begin your treatment with a closely trimmed nail that is also filed thin. Make this as easy on yourself as you can, don’t treat nail that can be trimmed or filed away. I also suggest using a method of gauging efficacy. Don’t rely on what it looks like from day to day.

Work at the University of Derby and at University of Central England in the UK showed that ‘Tea tree oil and lavender oil, when used in isolation, demonstrated unequivocal fungicidal activity’ against Trichophyton rubrum. Lavandula angustifolia was used. These essential oils can be used undiluted on the skin. Undiluted amounts of these essential oils measured in drops per week are very safe. For this therapy, the essential oils will be applied to the nail surface and cut end.

The University of Allahabad, India and St Thomas’s Hospital, London, UK conducted some work to determine the anti-fungal properties of some essential oils. ‘Foeniculum vulgare exhibited the strongest activity, completely inhibiting the mycelial growth of the nail-infective fungi, Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes and Scytalidium dimidiatum.’

Studies showed that Fennel essential oil was effective at 0.2, 0.4 and 0.5 ul/ml concentrations and that a concentration of 5% did not have an adverse affect on mammalian skin.

It is possible that the destructive work done by T. rubrum has allowed some colonization by a secondary fungus. These essential oils are known anti-fungals. Roman chamomile, Lavender spike, Myrrh, Opopanox, Savory and Garlic.

In the home office
Posted on: April 22, 2010

I am experiencing occasional rampant nostalgia, the reasons abound…  It has its benefits. Inspiration is one. And aren’t we always in need of some of that? I’ve got a new interest in creating perfumes, building perfumes. Smell is such an intimate experience. So personal. I was pouring in the office this AM, some perfect blend of what was on my hand was the smell of the Roller Rink. I called my oldest to ‘come and smell this!’, he didn’t agree.

Summer 1975

New purchase of Organic Rose Hip Seed Oil

Cold pressed from Chile. This bright orange oil has a clean fresh smell, not as heavy as some. Up to 45% Linoleic Acid and 35% Linolenic Acid.  This can be used neat on skin, but is great as a 10% addition to a facial cream or oil.

Directions for making a Rose Cream

  • You will need 3 pans for stove top
  • Rubber spatula, Wisk and something tiny to stir wax – chopstick works well.
  • Glass or ceramic bowl large enough to accommodate all the materials and allow space for whisking.
  • Container for your cream.
  • 30mls of base oil. Almond or Apricot are nice, Sunflower will work as well.
  • 2 grams of beeswax
  • 30 mls of Rose Hydrosol.
  • 3 mls of fresh lemon juice
  • 2-4 drops of Rose Essential oil.

Modifications can be made in the base oil, this is where you can amend your cream with Rose Hip Seed Oil or Raspberry Seed Oil. Use 20 mls base and 10 mls of the addition. You can use any Hydrosol or essential oil you would like. This is a Rose cream so I went with that theme.

  1. Warm the base oil in one of the pans one of the enamel pots, and the beeswax in another. When the beeswax is melted, stir it into the warm base oil with the chopstick. Warm and blend gently and slowly, they change temperature at different rates and can burn. Warm the Hydrosol in the third clean pan to the same temperature ure as the and-beeswax mixture. Ideally 150 degrees. Pour the warmed water into the mixing bowl. While whipping constantly with the wire whisk, drizzle the oil mixture slowly into the water. Your mixture should cream up quickly. If you have a helping hand or you pans are built just right, better results can be achieved if you add the oil/wax and water into the bowl in thin streams at the same time, whipping all the while.
  2. As this cools and emulsifies and starts to thicken you can now add the essential oil and lemon juice. I recommend whipping until it reaches room temperature to reduce separation. Scrape into a lidded jar with the spatula.

If your mixture just refuses to emulsify, don’t frustrate yourself with trying to repair it. There is no repair if it doesn’t meld like it should. It does take practice. It is likely a measurement error or too much difference in the temperatures of the oil and water. Whipping by hand produces less mess and better results than an electric beater

Essential oil profile
Posted on: April 22, 2010

The Mimosa I offer is an absolute made in France. The smell is classic Mimosa, soft and dry, sweet and lightly floral. It is fairly stable and will retain that scent for months and months. It looks and pours like honey, thick and shiny and tan. Usually a base note in perfumes because of that dry and powdery quality. The material is high in aldehydes, which are usually top notes like Violet and Hyacinth. Hmm, perhaps a standalone scent. Used on skin that is sensitive and stressed. As an inhalant for depression, fear, emotional hypersensitivity. Used in therapy sessions to alleviate those feelings and to help open communication.

I have also obtained a large quantity of Mimosa absolute that is very thick. Too thick to pour, too sticky to manipulate, a real bummer to work with. The smell is heavier and more fruity than the higher priced Mimosa. Long story about how I obtained it… but I have decided to dilute it in Damiana infused Almond oil, a little less than 50/50. The Almond oil holds it well in suspension and the feeling on the skin isn’t sticky. Glass 30ml bottle for $32. You can use it as it comes as a perfume or use the dilution as a base for your own creation.

Recipe
Posted on: April 22, 2010

Body powder

I visited with a fellow formulator a while ago. She and I talked about the idea of layering scents. Body care products that are scented with a single essential oil and layered to create a complete finished effect. She is a fan of body powder and wanted to incorporate that as an element of her line. That got me thinking… I remember scented body powder with that beautiful puff of down feathers. It seemed so decadent and feminine, where can you get it now a days? You can make your own.

2 ounces of white clay with 2 drops each of Petitgrain, Neroli and Sandalwood. You can leave out in a dish covered with a big puff if you can find one. This powder can be used for massage too, the clay is silky enough to reduce friction and leave you dry.

Bargains and Deals
Posted on: April 22, 2010

I bought a larger quantity of high quality pourable Mimosa this past purchase and have reduced the price. 2 g for $17.09, 5g $32.78 and 15g $79.54.

Mimosa dilute in glass 30ml bottle for $32.